FACTOR V (LEIDEN) LAB TEST

WHAT IS TESTED FOR IN A FACTOR V LEIDEN LAB TEST?

  • Activated Protein C Resistance with Reflex to Factor V (Leiden) Mutation
  • Activated Protein C Resistance (APC-R) test or assay
  • Factor V (Leiden) DNA Mutation Analysis with Reflex to HR2 Mutation Analysis

WHAT IS THE PRICE OF THE FACTOR V LEIDEN LAB TEST?

*Prices may vary by location – contact your local ANY LAB TEST NOW®

WHAT IS FACTOR V LEIDEN?

The body’s ability to form blood clots is critical to the healing process and when the coagulation (clotting) process is functioning normally platelets (small, sticky cell fragments) attach to and begin to collect at the injury site.  The clotting process includes many factors, including a clotting factor called factor V.  Factor V Leiden is a mutation of factor V.  This mutation prevents the breakdown of factor V after it has done its job, leading to abnormal blood clots.  Most people with Factor V Leiden never develop abnormal clots and never know that they have this mutation.  However, some people with Factor V Leiden develop clots that lead to long-term health problems or become life-threatening such as Stroke, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) or Pulmonary Emboli (PE). Women who become pregnant can develop preeclampsia or other blood clots which can be dangerous to themselves and to their unborn child.

If you have Factor V Leiden and have developed blood clots, medications can lessen your risk of developing additional blood clots and help you avoid potentially serious complications.  Factor V Leiden is an inherited gene mutation.  If you have inherited one copy of the defective gene, your chances of developing a blood clot increase slightly, but more rarely, if you inherit two copies, one from each parent, your risk of developing blood clots increases significantly.

WHY DO I NEED TO BE TESTED FOR FACTOR V LEIDEN?

Have you had unexplained blood clots before the age of 50?  Do you have a strong family history of thrombosis?

Only 10% of people with Factor V Leiden ever develop signs or symptoms. However, the first indication that you have the disorder may be the development of a blood clot (thrombosis).   If you have a family history of thrombosis or know that others in your family have the factor V Leiden mutation you may want to consider getting tested.  Having early Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) (before the age of 50) or becoming pregnant if you have a family history of thrombosis would be indicators that you should get tested.

If you have the factor V Leiden mutation and become pregnant your doctor should monitor you carefully for signs of blood clot problems.  A higher risk of miscarriage is associated with this mutation.  If you are in a high-risk situation or have already had thrombosis your doctor may prescribe a blood thinning medication such as warfarin or heparin to treat blood clots or to prevent blood clots.

TEST DETAILS:

A genetic test can be performed to determine whether you have the genetic mutation and whether you have the mutated gene and whether you have one or two mutated genes.  This test can be performed in combination with another test option to determine whether your blood is resistant to activated protein C, one of the anti-clotting proteins that help control factor V. This is known as an activated protein C (APC) resistance assay.  Normal results would show that the blood is not resistant to APC and therefore any abnormal blood clots are not likely to be caused by the factor V Leiden mutation.

If your blood is resistant to activated protein C, you likely have a mutation in the factor V gene.  95% of people resistant to activated protein C have the factor V Leiden mutation.  A follow up test to consider is the Factor V (Leiden) DNA Mutation Analysis with Reflex to HR2 Mutation Analysis.

WHAT TYPE OF PHYSICIAN SHOULD I SEE?

You should see your primary care physician, a hematologist or a geneticist.

close
close